Marijuana

REM Cycle Review: Cell phone tax, test your altruism, and marijuana CPAs

REM Cycle Review Header Image RED & WHITE with photo V2-01.png

It’s Friday, and that means it’s time for another edition of the REM Cycle Review, your weekly roundup of all the tax news that’s fit to print. We’ve got a few tax tidbits that might have slipped under your radar this week. If you’re reading this on your mobile device, our first story will be of special interest to you…

Cell phone users are paying more in sales and use tax than ever before. According to a new study by the Tax Foundation, wireless tax rates have been on a steady increase since 2006—to an average current rate of 19.1%. [www.taxfoundation.org]

This December, you can test your altruism! Because that charitable contribution might not be tax-deductible after all. [Forbes]

Could raising taxes on alcohol save lives and prevent crime? The answer is complicated (it usually is), but sobering. A worthwhile read, especially during the festive season. [Vox]

Accountants are increasingly finding that pot is a proverbial pot of gold. A brand-new, multi-billion-dollar global industry is in desperate need of number-crunchers: marijuana. The pros for accountants: higher fees due to highly specialized knowledge of accounting practices. The cons, well… [Business Insider]

This week we’re watching…

The REM Cycle editorial staff recommends one professional development video and one funny or thought-provoking video each week.

What makes a great leader? Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests it's someone who makes their employees feel secure and draws staffers into a circle of trust. But creating trust and safety means taking on responsibility.

A misplaced cell phone leads to unexpected consequences. Featuring Vine and YouTube star Darius Benson.

The REM Cycle Review is a weekly compilation of newsworthy articles pertaining to taxation, accounting, and life in general. Got a hot tip? Email us at REMCycle@rem-co.com.

WAKE UP WITH REM: Soda tax, tax reform, a reformed form, and marijuana tax

Soda tax.png

We can't think of a clever opening paragraph this week. If you can think of one, leave it in the comments below.

Soda taxes again. Several states, including California, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Mississippi, Arizona, and Michigan, are either considering or have already adopted food and/or soda taxes. But what happens when individual municipalities have their own food taxes? [Reason.com]

Tax Reform 2.0. Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas), Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, released a two-page outline of a plan to reform the nation’s most recent tax reform. The idea is nothing new — for instance, several states have already drafted legislation to mitigate the SALT deduction cap — but it will be interesting to see Brady’s finished plan. [Bloomberg]

ICYMI: Facebook stock drops by more than the worth of the entire global cheese market. John Oliver hopes that this will inspire the return of MySpace. (Strong language warning.) [YouTube]

At last! The new, improved(?) W-4. You know that annoying form you fill out every once in a while? The one where you fill in zeroes and ones, etc., to calculate the number of withholding allowances you can claim? The IRS has revamped it, and you’ll find a few surprises. [Forbes]

New Jersey budgets $20M in medicinal marijuana revenue for FY 2019. But based on tax data from previous years, this would mean handing out more than twice the number of existing cannabis prescriptions. Unless Willie Nelson moves to the Garden State, experts warn that’s not going to happen. [NJ.com]

This week's videos

The Wake-Up Call is The REM Cycle’s biweekly compilation of newsworthy articles pertaining to taxation, accounting, and life in general. Got a hot tip? Email us at REMCycle@rem-co.com.

Wake up with REM: Blockchain, tax fraud, and... Cheech & Chong?

Richard "Cheech" Marin and Tommy Chong.  Source

Richard "Cheech" Marin and Tommy Chong. Source

Um, wow. The last few days have been pretty exciting: a new system promises to change the face of bookkeeping, Apple fails to avoid paying taxes in Ireland, and marijuana entrepreneurs find themselves holding the bag (literally). We’re always looking for ways to help our readers with their professional development, so we also have some conversational advice to bring your communication skills to the next level, as well as an emotional support velociraptor.

You’re welcome.

An Ohio tax preparer was acquitted on tax fraud charges after almost five years of investigation by the IRS, including a sting operation in which an undercover agent failed to get the defendant to include an erroneous Child Tax Credit claim. [Accounting Today]

10 ways to have a better conversation:
When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations - and that most of us don't converse very well.

Artificial intelligence is coming to a ledger near you! PeaCounts, a blockchain-enabled bookkeeping system, is expected to launch this summer. “Business owners will no longer require a dual-entry system with manual reconciliations,” said PeaCounts co-founder Crystal Stranger, in a statement. “Combined with machine learning, PeaCounts has developed a system that makes manual entry a thing of the past.” [Accounting Today

Do you itemize your deductions? This might be a good time for a checkup on your taxes. [Forbes]

In our last Wake Up, we mentioned AllianceBernstein is moving to Nashville for local tax incentives. You’ll never guess who’s moving into their old building… [Globest.com]

Ireland takes a big bite out of Apple as the tech giant pays Ireland its first tranche of disputed taxes. [Reuters]

Cheech and Chong they’re not—marijuana entrepreneurs face unusual challenges in paying their taxes. Federal laws necessitate bags of cash and stealthy deliveries: this is how pot start-ups pay taxes. [New York Times]

 

My dinosaur is a service animal:
Just because it's a Velociraptor with knives for teeth doesn't mean it's not my best friend.

 

The Wake-Up Call is The REM Cycle’s biweekly compilation of newsworthy articles pertaining to taxation, accounting, and life in general. Got a hot tip? Email us at REMCycle@rem-co.com.